Create Magical Fun with Harry Potters Butterbeer

   Butterbeer in WWoHP

Harry Potter’s Butterbeer

Ingredients

  • 1 cup light or dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon rum extract
  • 4 12 ounce bottles cream soda
  • (adult version add real rum & butterscotch snapps – after mixture has cooled)

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan over medium, combine the brown sugar and water. Bring to a gentle boil and cook, stirring often, until the mixture reads 240 F on a candy thermometer.
  2. Stir in the butter, salt, vinegar and 1/4 of the heavy cream. Set aside to cool to room temperature.
  3. Once the mixture has cooled, stir in the rum extract.
  4. In a medium bowl, combine 2 tablespoons of the brown sugar mixture and the remaining 1/2 cup of heavy cream. Use an electric mixer to beat until just thickened, but not completely whipped, about 2 to 3 minutes.
  5. To serve, divide the brown sugar mixture between 4 tall glasses (about 1/4 cup for each glass). Add 1/4 cup of cream soda to each glass, then stir to combine. Fill each glass nearly to the top with additional cream soda, then spoon the whipped topping over each.
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Imbolc (Candlemas) February 2nd, 2014.

Traditions upon Imbolc – Celebrate with Mulled or Spiced Wines, household duties are Spring cleaning and at sunset or just after ritual, to light every candle or lamp in the house – if only for a few moments. (symbolizing re-birth) Meditate in the candlelight with your Spiced Wine and organize your thoughts as you did to your home.

IMBOLC  (Candlemas) (February 1-2)
(Brigid’s Day) Not common to all Pagans, this is very popular with Wiccan’s and various Celtic sects. Imbolc is a Celtic festival marking the beginning of spring. Most commonly it is celebrated on 1 or 2 February Brigid is the Celtic goddess of fire and inspirational Hearth & Home Deity (Poetry, Smithcraft and Healing) as well as yet another representation of the Fertility of Femininity and Love.  The holiday was, and for many still is, a festival of the hearth and home, and a celebration of the lengthening days and the early signs of spring. Celebrations often involved hearth fires, special foods (butter, milk, and bannock, for example), divination or watching for omens, candles or a bonfire if the weather permits. Imbolc is traditionally a time of weather prognostication, and the old tradition of watching to see if serpents or badgers came from their winter dens is perhaps a precursor to the North American Groundhog Day.

Brigid had such a strong following among the Celtics that the Christian church decided it was easier to assimilate her into their own system, and so there came about the making of Saint Brigit and all the stories they created about her so that her followers would leave their old beliefs enough so they would not side with the Druids, who were known at that time as ‘the snakes’ because of their tendency to have tamed snakes that were used to help produce various healing mixtures via their venom, and who were violently opposing the  Catholic church.  In History, of course, the druids lost against the overwhelming odds presented by the church, led by a man who would then be himself sainted by the church, their Saint Patrick (who was no clergyman but a warrior). Thus Christian rule of various sorts came into Ireland. Handcrafts are often sacrificed to Brigid or dedicated to her as they are started on this day.  Its celebration is done with many candles and as usual much feasting.  The Christians also took, moved slightly and used this date by creating St. Valentine and using the day for one of chaste love reflections.  Imbolic marks the recovery of the Goddess after birth of the God. The warmth of the power of the God fertilizes the Earth and so the earliest beginnings of spring occur. This is a Sabbat of purification, a festival of light and fertility. It’s also a traditional time for initiations into covens and self-dedication rituals. Also known as: Feast of Pan, Feast of Torches, Oimelc.


IMBOLC Recipes:
 
BAKED CUSTARD WITH GINGER
- 3 Tablespoons Brown Sugar, 3/4 teaspoon Finely Grated Fresh Ginger, 3 large Eggs, lightly beaten, 2 1/2 cups Milk, 1/3 cup Granulated Sugar, 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract, 1/4 teaspoon Cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon Salt, 1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg. Method: Mix brown sugar with ginger and divide evenly onto bottoms of 6 buttered individual custard cups or ramekins.
In medium mixing bowl, blend eggs with milk, sugar, vanilla and seasonings. Pour evenly into prepared custard cups. Place cups in a large deeper pan, then fill with hot water to come halfway up sides of cups (a hot water bath).
Bake at 350 F. oven for 35 to 40 minutes, or until knife inserted near edge comes out clean. Remove cups from bath. Run knife around edges to loosen. Place serving plate over top of cup and carefully invert custard onto plate. Serve warm or cover, chill and serve cold.


DUBLIN SUNDAY CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE
- 5 pounds Corned beef brisket, 1 large Onion stuck with 6 whole cloves, 6 Carrots, peeled and sliced, 8 Potatoes, peeled and cubed, 1 teaspoon Dried Thyme, 1 small Bunch Parsley, 1 head Cabbage (about 2 lbs) cut in quarters. Horseradish Sauce:, 1/2 pint Whipping Cream, 2 – 3 Tablespoons prepared horseradish. Method: Put beef in a large pot and cover with cold water. Add all other ingredients except cabbage and bring to a boil with the lid off the pot. Turn to simmer and cook for 3 hours. Skim fat from top as it rises. Remove the thyme, parsley and onion. Add cabbage. Simmer for 20 minutes until cabbage is cooked. Remove the meat and cut into pieces. Place on center of a large platter. Strain the cabbage and season it heavily with black pepper. Surround the beef with the cabbage, carrots and potatoes. Serve with horseradish sauce. Horseradish Sauce: Whip cream until it stand in peaks. Fold in horseradish.

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Countdown to Yule – Winter Solstice Dec 21

MerryYuleThe origins of the Yule Log can be traced back to the Midwinter festivals in which the Norsemen indulged…nights filled with feasting, “drinking Yule” and watching the fire leap around the log burning in the home hearth. The ceremonies and beliefs associated with the Yule Log’s sacred origins are closely linked to representations of health, fruitfulness and productivity. In England, the Yule was cut and dragged home by oxen or horses as the people walked alongside and sang merry songs. It was often decorated with evergreens and sometimes sprinkled with grain or cider before it was finally set alight.

In Yugoslavia, the Yule Log was cut just before dawn on Christmas Eve and carried into the house at twilight. The wood itself was decorated with flowers, colored silks and gold, and then doused with wine and an offering of grain. In an area of France known as Provencal, families would go together to cut the Yule Log, singing as they went along. These songs asked for blessings to be bestowed upon their crops and their flocks. The people of Provencal called their Yule Log the trefoire and, with great ceremony, carried the log around the house three times and christened it with wine before it was set ablaze.

To all European races, the Yule Log was believed to bring beneficial magic and was kept burning for at least twelve hours and sometimes as long as twelve days, warming both the house and those who resided within. When the fire of the Yule Log was finally quenched, a small fragment of the wood would be saved and used to light the next year’s log. It was also believed that as long as the Yule Log burned, the house would be protected from witchcraft. The ashes that remained from the sacred Yule Log were scattered over fields to bring fertility, or cast into wells to purify and sweeten the water. Sometimes, the ashes were used in the creation of various charms…to free cattle from vermin, for example, or to ward off hailstorms.happyyulenotecard

Some sources state that the origin of Yule is associated with an ancient Scandinavian fertility god and that the large, single Log is representative of a phallic idol. Tradition states that this Log was required to burn for twelve days and a different sacrifice to the fertility god had to be offered in the fire on each of those twelve days.

Yule Log

 

A yule log is a large and very hard log which is burned in the hearth as a part of traditional Yule or Christmas celebrations in several European cultures. It may also be associated with the Winter Solstice festival or the Twelve Days of Christmas, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, or Twelfth Night.

Just a short re-cap for those of you just joining us…Winter Solstice, the time of the year when the days get longer and the sun begins to return was truly a cause for celebration among our ancestors in Scandinavia. Their Midwinter Feast lasted at least twelve days. So there are the twelve days of Christmas.

Most Christmas traditions are rooted deep in ancient Yule rituals, many coming from the Vikings. Historic imagescalh6upnevidence indicates that Jesus was not born on December 25, but in the Spring. Why is then Christmas celebrated on December 25? A common theory is that the Christian church designated this date as the day of Christ’s birth to coincide with the Nordic Mid-Winter Solstice celebrations, as well as with a Roman mid-winter fest called Saturnalia, in order to “facilitate” the conversion of “heathens” to Christianity. Even a man dressed up asOl Man Winter” handing out presents originated here, as well as decorated trees and pine boughs, mistletoe, large celebratory dinners & drink. Scandinavian forefathers were not alone in celebrating the Winter Solstice. All over the world, and throughout history, people have celebrated the sun’s return after the winter with a wide diversity of rituals and traditions. So spice up that Wine, sing some traditional songs and plan your own “Yule” traditions.

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Enlighten your November with some Aromatherapy

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Spending Time with my Chickens :)

It’s been a while since I updated my site, I must apologize – but, hear me out. I’ve dove head first into raising Heritage Chickens for their Eggs as well as Meat. Also I’m helping other small hobby farms by selling the fertilized eggs of my purebred offspring who are on the “rare” and “endangered” poultry list. You can follow my Small Farm Chicken blogging via my other website www.HeritageEggFarm.com or follow me facebook with the same name Heritage Egg FarmSAM_5668

Using my Mother Nature inspired Pagan roots I’m providing a lifestyle for my family with naturally raised chickens & eggs, it’s very rewarding and not much work at all. Come see what I’ve been up to this summer and browse through tons of Chicken & Egg recipe’s too! I hope you’ll continue to follow me on both websites & FB pages. I promise to keep up with my Kitchen Wiccan ;)

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Lemony Lavender Frozen Yogurt

1/2 cup fat-free half-and-half                                  Lavendar treat
2 teaspoons dried lavender
4 cups vanilla fat-free Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons finely shredded lemon peel
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/3 cup honey
Finely shredded lemon peel (optional)
Fresh lemon slices (optional)
Fresh lavender sprigs (optional)

1. In a small saucepan bring fat-free half-and-half just to boiling. Remove from heat; add dried lavender. Let stand 30 minutes.
2. In a large bowl combine yogurt, the 2 tablespoons lemon peel, the lemon juice, honey, and the lavender mixture. Cover and chill 1 hour.
3. Freeze chilled mixture in a 2-quart ice cream freezer according to the manufacturer’s directions. Serve at once for a softer frozen yogurt. For a firmer mixture, place in an airtight container; freeze 30 to 60 minutes. If desired, garnish servings with additional lemon peel, lemon slices and/or fresh lavender sprigs.

MAKES: 8 servings

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BELTANE

BeltaneLoversDepending on your particular tradition, there are many different ways you can celebrate Beltane, but the focus is nearly always on fertility. It’s the time when the earth mother opens up to the fertility god, and their union brings about healthy livestock, strong crops, and new life all around.

Food, Drink & Love are the order of the evening starting on the evening of April 30th and continuing into the day May 1st. Maypole dancing, bonfires, planting rituals all part of celebrating the fertility god & goddess. Beltane is a season of fertility and fire, and we often find this reflected in the magic of the season. It’s a magical Spring time from mating season in animals, ritual sex to fertility magic, along with the magic found in gardens and nature. The Great Rite (ritual sex) is more than just sexual union; it is the enactment of the creation of the universe itself in Wiccan tradition. Ritual sex has a number of different purposes besides the Great Rite — it can be used to raise energy, create magical power, or find a sense of spiritual communion with a partner. Celebrate your bodies and their power.  Body painting, purifying baths, and making love outdoors are all wonderful and exuberant ideas for this fiery celebration.

herbal gardenBeltane is a time of fertility, not only for people but for the land as well. If you plant a garden each summer, Beltane is a good time to do some fertility magic so that you will have an abundant crop by the time the harvest rolls around. Dancing, singing/chanting & bonfires are held in farmers fields Ashes from the fire are spread out and tilled into the soil for a successful season.

No Pagan celebration is really complete without a meal to go along with it. For Beltane, celebrate with foods that honor fertility of the earth. Enjoy light spring soups, fertility bread loaves, eggs, dairy, honey and decorate with wreaths made from fresh flowers.

IRISH SODA BREAD

  • 3 1/2 cups (450 g) all-purpose flour, plus extra for dustingsoda bread
  • 1 tsp superfine (caster) or granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate of soda)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups (350-425 ml) buttermilk
  • melted butter for brushing loaf surface
  • adding raisins or dried fruit is optional
  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (230 C)
  2. Sift the flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt into a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in most of the buttermilk, leaving about 1/4 cup (50 ml) in the measuring cup. Using one hand with your fingers outstretched like a claw, bring the flour and liquid together, adding more buttermilk, if necessary. Don’t knead the mixture, or it will become heavy. The dough should be soft, but not too wet and sticky.
  3. When the dough comes together, turn it onto a floured work surface and bring it together a little more. Pat the dough into a round about 1 1/2 inches (4 cm) thick and cut a deep cross in it – or a Pentagram :) brush with melted butter. Place on a baking sheet or in a cast iron pan / crock.
  4. Bake for 15 minutes. Turn down the heat to 400 degrees F (200 C) and bake for 30 minutes more. When done, the loaf will sound slightly hollow when tapped on the bottom and be golden in color. Allow to cool on a wire rack.

 

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Masala Chai — Aphrodisiac Tea Recipe

chilled chaiScroll down our Domestic Goddess Boudoir page to find our recipe for Masala Chai — Aphrodisiac Tea Recipe it’s absolutely sinful. Make batches of it ahead of time and chill it for after dinner drinks. Add a shot of Kahlua to your chilled Chai and serve it in tall glasses on ice. Makes a great sweet ending to your dinner.

 

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10 Ways Dreams Can Change Your Life

john-henry-fuseli-the-nightmare1. Discover what you truly believe and feel about your life, and use that knowledge to heal and prosper.

2. Get solutions in dreams to seemingly unsolvable problems.

3. Become inspired in dreams to help yourself and others to live better and happier lives.

4. Reconnect with loved ones who have crossed over, and heal from grief and loss.

5. Experience a deep connection with the Divine in your dreams, bringing peace, harmony, and balance to your life.

6. Set intentions for your dreams to help your career blossom and succeed.

7. Master the power of your subconscious mind and reset your vibration to attract all that you want in life.

8. Dream your way to greater creativity and self-expression.

9. Heal emotional wounds and use your dreams to draw into your life the perfect romantic partner.

10. Learn your own symbolic dream language and experience greater intuitive wisdom about what is truly right for you.

Visit my new Law of Attraction & Dream Dictionary tab to Dreamsdiscover the secrets to your sleeping world.

 

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Spring Equinox (March 20, 2013)

houseworkOstara / Eostre – the Spring Equinox is a time of renewal and new beginnings, a time to plant your seeds and plan for the future.  Change is in the air and if you don’t do it now, the year will creep in and you’ll have a disorganized year ahead.  This is the ideal time to clean to Spring clean, get rid of the old and welcome in the new.  It may not be easy, but some simple physical work and mental effort can be focused to rid your life and home of negativity, clear the problems of the past and provide for a brighter future. Do a house cleansing while your at it!

OstaraOstara / Eostre is also known by various other names, such as:  the Rites of Spring, Lady’s Day, Alban Eilir, Festival of the Trees, Eostre’s Day.  It is also my husbands birthday – so it’s an event not missed in this house!
As with many popular pagan festivals, when Christianity arrived, Ostara was renamed and many of its customs and symbolism incorporated into the Christian holiday of Easter.  Easter takes its name from Eostre, the same Goddess of Spring associated with Ostara, and like Ostara, its date is variable, being calculated as the first Sunday after the first Full Moon, after the Vernal Equinox.In the mythology of the Witch’s Sabbats, Ostara celebrates the return of the Goddess from the Underworld.  Warmed by the strengthening light of the Sun, she awakes bursting forth from her sleep and blankets the earth with fertility.  As the Sun God stretches and grows to maturity, he and the Goddess walk the fields and forests and, delighted with the abundance of life and nature, inspire all living things to grow and reproduce.
Ostara is a time to celebrate the arrival of Spring and the renewal and rebirth of nature after the cold dark days of Winter.  Since the early buds of nature appeared at Imbolc, the Sun has continued to climb and gain in strength until now, at Ostara, daylight and darkness are in equal balance.  As days lengthen and overtake night, so too does the earth begin to thaw from the last freezing grip of winter.  Now is the time our farmers make ready their ploughs and prepare their oxen to pull them, and seed corn saved from the last harvest is checked to ensure its quality and suitability for planting. To our ancestors, the success of the planting season and the harvest to follow was of life and death importance, for the bounty to be gained from the new plantings would be needed to sustain them through the hardships of the next winter.

Celebrations include, great bonfires & feasts. All food in tune with the season with special attention paid to Eggs as they are symbolic of Ostara renewed birth & fertility. Feasts usually consist of Fresh Herbs, Breads, honey cakes, strawberries, fish, biscuits, cheeses, honey, asparagus, lamb, ham & wild game.

EOSTRE IMBOLC Recipes

EGG NOG- 1 Tablespoon Sugar, Shaved ice (1/2 glass), 1 medium Egg, Whiskey (or Rum), 1/2 cup Milk, Nutmeg. Method: Measure one wineglass of whiskey or rum, add other ingredients (use whole milk), shake thoroughly and strain. Grate a little nutmeg on top and serve.

ROAST LEG OF LAMB – 5 pounds leg of lamb, 2 cloves garlic (sliced), 1/3 cup olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, coarse or Kosher, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground, 1 teaspoon rosemary, 1/2 teaspoon thyme. Method: Trim lamb of fat. Cut slits about 1/2″ deep all over lamb and insert slivers of garlic. Rub all over with olive oil. Combine salt, pepper, and herbs and rub herb mixture all over lamb. Allow to sit at room temperature 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Roast lamb for 15 minutes at 450 degrees, then turn oven down to 350. Continue to roast until desired degree of doneness is reached, about an hour for medium rare. Baste with pan juices once or twice. Remove from pan and allow to rest at room temperature for 15-20 minutes before carving. Squeeze fresh lemon wedges over lamb before serving. Potatoes, carrots, and onions may be roasted in pan with lamb. Baste occasionally.

ROSEMARY POTATOES-  1 1/2 pounds Small new potatoes, 2 Tablespoons Olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon Salt, 2 cloves garlic, minced, 1 1/2 Tablespoons Fresh rosemary, chopped, 1/2 tsp of Salt & pepper, juice of 1 lemon.  Method: Place potatoes in a pan, in one layer, add the oil, lemon & spices,  and bake in a 350~ oven until crispy and browned, about 30 minutes. Serve with roasted and grilled meats or poultry.

MIXED GREENS WITH STRAWBERRY VINAIGRETTE- 4 Fresh Crushed Strawberries, 4 Tablespoons Balsamic vinegar, 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard, 1 teaspoon Garlic, minced, 1/3 cup Olive oil, 8 cups Mixed baby greens, 2 tsp of fresh chopped Parsley. Method: Combine first 3 ingredients in medium bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Place mixed baby greens in large bowl. Toss with enough dressing to coat and serve.

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